Lab 3 [Georgia, Hess, & Seamus Collab]

Exercise 1:

2nd website:

http://hotchkiss.neatline.org/neatline-exhibits/show/battle-of-chancellorsville/fullscreen

This map portrays the dynamic progression of the battle within the duration three days

It plots the summarized movements of each army for each day

Provides specific timeline of events for each day

This map portrays the preparational positioning of each army and strategy before the battle began

This is a more broad representation of the first day of battle from the strategic perspective of Jackson’s army

4th website:

http://neatline.dclure.org/neatline/show/gemini-over-baja-california

The comparison between the old and new satellite images of California show the differences and similarities between the two.

 

B.

2nd website:

The descriptions on the side panel gives an in depth view into the specific times and events of the battle.

The opposing armies are clearly identifiable by their colors

Each number represents one of the definitive events of the day

An interactive timeline between May 2nd and 4th

The superimposed map of 1863 on the map of today provides perspective between the two time periods. The pictures of the personnel give a face to the name instead of just providing details on the soldier.

 

4th website:

Multiple previous satellite images of west coast of mexico on top of current satellite imagry

The ability to see all three different satellite images highlighted together

A spatial perspective in order to give depth

Description on the two different Gemini flights

The same islands are outlined in each of the photos to provide the perspective of each picture

Interactivity between similar landmarks for example when Isla San Jose selected on one map, it is selected on the other two images

 

C: 2nd website:

The site should provide a more general statement on the focus of research of the site. The site needs to have a general overview in order to show viewers exactly what they are looking at. The project also lacks a bibliography and the source of information is unclear.

 

4th website:

The visual aspect of the site is confusing for viewers due to the overlapping of pictures. It is not apparent that one picture is a zoomed in shot of the larger satellite picture. Also, the island names are hyperlinked but don’t give extra information about themselves.

 

Exercise 2:

A:

Atlantic Network Project:

The spatial argument tracks the slave trade through the atlantic and provides maps that analyze the slave casualties as well as the weather patterns during the voyages.

Twitter Site:

Twitter in realtime shows the tweet with the search term of the user’s choice along with a chosen location. The results of the search vary depending on if the subject and location correlate. The maps are moveable and continue to search as the pin is moved.

 

B:

Atlantic Network:

The Atlantic Network project uses current ArcGIS maps as a base. There are two separate maps which display the information. The first map has a white and gray base with ship paths marked by purple lines, as well as slave deaths marked by black dots with increasing size in relation to number of deaths. The second map is in full color with similar ship paths, but slave deaths are measured by density.  A third map allows both to be seen with a swipe bar to separate the two.


Twitter in realtime:

Twitter in realtime uses a pin that locates the search term in a specific area. The pin is moveable and will readjust and reflect the new location’s results. The search buffer can also readjust according to size.

 

C:
Atlantic Network

 

Twitter in realtime:

I would add a filter to the tweets to regulate whose tweets are visible. It could be filtered by most popular, most commented on, and most retweeted.  I would also extend the time of the visible tweets past 3 days in order to provide a more in depth search. I would also add the ability to expand the range of the geographic location

 

D.

http://hotchkiss.neatline.org/neatline-exhibits/show/battle-of-chancellorsville/fullscreen

Hypercities acts as an active database that has many active sites. It is a platform to find many different types of information, not just one category. Neatline’s information is stagnant. This project is not an actively updated database like Hypercities is. The project uses a finite amount of information in an interactive map. With the Hypercity twitter map, the search is customizable, which improves the project’s ability to be interactive and engaging.

Summary Statement

The lab showed how GIS technology is used through a multitude of websites. Some websites were more clear than others while showcasing various types of information. The question of “What’s the point?” was very clear in the “Gemini over Baja California” and the “Battle of Chancellorsville.” The two are navigable websites that have specific spatial research arguments. The importance of location is clear; the Gemini project explores a zoomed in shot of the overall satellite view while the Battle project displays important locations of a specific armed conflict. Both maps are interactive and allow the user to access more information; the two give spatial perspective through an adjustable sidebar that allows zoom. However, a drawback is that they are both static images of events/places in the past. The satellite images are from 1965 and 66 while the map from the battle dates back to 1863. Overall, both projects from exercise one offer strong spatial arguments and representations with clear and navigable maps. As the lab progressed, thick mapping emerged as the vital piece to spatial humanities.  The ability to overlay data on interactive maps allow historians to relay information more effectively than a simple narrative piece, i.e. make a spatial argument.  In both the Twitter in Realtime and Atlantic Network Project, the goal is to present their information using interactive maps in relation to a specific set a data.  The Atlantic Network Project’s spatial argument is in relation to deaths along the slave trade’s path, while the Twitter in Realtime’s argument is a two kilometer area’s responses in relation to a current topic.  Even though the topics of the two projects are different, their use of thick mapping create a spatial argument.  The Atlantic Network Project makes a stronger spatial argument since it is a directed toward a specific set of information, rather than an “up to the user” search option. Also, the three map setup of the Atlantic Network Project’s allows for a more directed argument to be made. Each project in this lab offered different perspectives about their subjects and were able to do so with the utilization of GISystems. Hypercities offers different types of GISystems than Neatline. Hypercities presents projects that are much more interactive. The “Mapping Twitter in Realtime” project presented an interactive search engine. Browsers can filter for tweets that contained specific “buzzwords” within a specific geographic location. This GIS uses VGI to supply the results for the search. We can draw numerous different conclusions from the various possible searches. This project is dynamic because the results for each search change as time passes because there is a constant supply of tweets. This project has potential for many applications, specifically commercial exploitation. Businesses can use this tool to observe the behavior of individuals in a certain geographic location and capitalize on their demands. This is an example of a highly interactive GISystem that provides a tool to the public. This project allows people to better understand the behavior of individuals in a geographic location. All of these spatial humanities projects allow us to digest information visually and in ways that offer different perspectives. Presenting information in this manner allows us to potentially draw different conclusions that we otherwise would not be able to.  

Lab 3: Personal Response

As the lab progressed, thick mapping emerged as the vital piece to spatial humanities.  The ability to overlay data on interactive maps allow historians to relay information more effectively than a simple narrative piece, i.e. make a spatial argument.  In both the Twitter in Realtime and Atlantic Network Project, the goal is to present their information using interactive maps in relation to a specific set a data.  The Atlantic Network Project’s spatial argument is in relation to deaths along the slave trade’s path, while the Twitter in Realtime’s argument is a two kilometer area’s responses in relation to a current topic.  Even though the topics of the two projects are different, their use of thick mapping create a spatial argument.  The Atlantic Network Project makes a stronger spatial argument since it is a directed toward a specific set of information, rather than an “up to the user” search option. Also, the three map setup of the Atlantic Network Project’s allows for a more directed argument to be made.

Solo Post [Lab 3]

These projects were all examples of GISystems. Each offered different perspectives about their subjects and were able to do so with the utilization of GISystems. The “Mapping Twitter in Realtime” project presented an interactive search engine. Browsers can filter for tweets that contained specific “buzzwords” within a specific geographic location. This GIS uses VGI to supply the results for the search. We can draw numerous different conclusions from the various possible searches. This project is dynamic because the results for each search change as time passes because there is a constant supply of tweets. This project has potential for many applications, specifically commercial exploitation. Businesses can use this tool to observe the behavior of individuals in a certain geographic location and capitalize on their demands. This is an example of a highly interactive GISystem that provides a tool to the public. This project allows people to better understand the behavior of individuals in a geographic location.

Lab 3: Solo Response

The lab showed how GIS technology is used through a multitude of websites. Some websites were more clear than others while showcasing various types of information. The question of “What’s the point?” was very clear in the “Gemini over Baja California” and the “Battle of Chancellorsville.” The two are navigable websites that have specific spatial research arguments. The importance of location is clear; the Gemini project explores a zoomed in shot of the overall satellite view while the Battle project displays important locations of a specific armed conflict. Both maps are interactive and allow the user to access more information; the two give spatial perspective through an adjustable sidebar that allows zoom. However, a drawback is that they are both static images of events/places in the past. The satellite images are from 1965 and 66 while the map from the battle dates back to 1863. Overall, both projects offer strong spatial arguments and representations with clear and navigable maps.

Lab 3: Individual Response

This lab delved into a wide variety of projects that utilized GIS technology and spatial imaging to develop insightful arguments (whether intentionally or not) about the drawbacks and the benefits of spatial humanities. In exercise two, I compared the “Greene Street Project” and “Twitter in Realtime” sites. Both projects focused centrally on the importance of temporality in location, however, the “Greene Street Project” analyzed space and time from a historical context (decades, centuries, etc.) while “Twitter in Realtime” represented a more instantaneous version of the spatiotemporal world. For example, the “Greene Street Project” displayed a photograph of a mid-1900’s New York City block, which, when drawn back, would be replaced by a photograph of that same block in the current decade. On the other hand, the “Twitter in Realtime” site represented instantaneous temporality by allowing users to do a word search (e.g. “Obama”, “Trump”, etc.) and filtering the search by location (e.g. Paris, NYC, etc.) to generate a GIS map of the word-location search results within the last 5 seconds. These sites form a spatial melange to promote greater understanding of our surroundings; providing retrospective spatial analysis of who we are in contrast to our past and modern spatial analysis of the diversity of thought in our era.

Lab #3: Spatial Humanities (Group Narrative)

Group Members: Charles Feinberg, Dehao Tu

 

In Gemini over Baja California, the argument being made is that multiple geographic images can improve our understanding of geographical scales. We therefore must be careful in accepting geographical spaces shown on maps as truth. Do not believe everything you see immediately, we must question our perceptions. The Battle of Chancellorsville argues that mapping has changed with time. We must be aware of the geographic and humanistic features adapting and therefore must continually update our maps with mapping technology.

The Gemini site uses a foreground and background scale and two successive images taken at different times and places to fully replicate the importance of multiple perspectives and known geographical features to fully comprehend size and spacing of aerial imaging. The Battle of Chancellorsville site is more historical GIS-esk documentation using overlay mapping technology to demonstrate a spatiotemporal difference in modern mapping vs. aged mapping.

In the Gemini site, we would have liked to be able to rotate the whole map and be able to analyze the geography from different perspectives. A map key for pinpointed geographical features would also have been helpful, currently the key is woven into the interactive literature margin on the left, but this is not conducive to quick analysis of the sites display. For the Battle of Chancellorsville site, we would be able to manipulate the overlay, currently the overlay is stagnant. If we could move the overlay to see the modern geographical map underneath, we think this could be a really beneficial addition to the study.

For exercise two, we compared the “Green Street Project” to “Twitter in Realtime”. Both projects emphasized the importance of temporality in location. However, the “Green Street Project” expanded the temporality to a historical context, for example what a New York City street looked like in the mid-1900’s vs. what it looks like now, while the “Twitter in Realtime” site represented instantaneous temporality by screening realtime twitter posts by both user-generated word searches and location of post “e.g. New York, Los Angeles, Paris”. Compared to “Twitter in Realtime”, which utilizes newsfeeds and georeferencing to locate individual posts continuously, the “Green Street Project” is far more static. “Green Street Project” is  preprogrammed to be updated manually by its proprietors and has little connection to the ever-changing social network sphere. Both sites dynamically utilize GIS to overlay information into its particular GPS location on a map. Furthermore, both sites use pinpointed images/text to enhance visualization and interactivity to engage viewers in their argument. To further the “Twitter in Realtime” argument, it would behove the site to not restrict geographic locations to cities and to increase the number of georeferenced tweets being displayed to hours rather than minutes. By increasing geographic domain and number georeferenced tweets, we could better visualize trends on a wider scale. The “Green Street Project” could be benefited by allowing the users/viewers of the site to upload their own images and be more engaged in Volunteer Geographic Information (VGI) domain. This would promote the website to become more current, more engaging and more informative, however, it should be stated that the progress of this innovation is contingent upon users providing accurate, worthwhile information.   

Finally, the most obvious difference between the Neatline and Hypercities web-pages is that outside the homepage, the Hypercities GIS platform is not functioning. This acts to emphasize the need for sites to be continuously updated if they are to be useful over time. Because Hypercities has become outdated, other webpages associated with the Hypercities domain are becoming antiquated and unsustainable. On the other hand, Neatline actively promotes innovation and sustainability because it is an update platform for GIS technology and related research.

Lab Assignment #3: My findings

After comparing the projects on the two platforms: Neatline and Hypercities, I realize that a successful geospatial DH project should be accessible, maintainable, and useful.

In general, a website presenting any DH project should consider its accessibility and maintainability. The projects chose the Hypercities as their platform were essentially “dead” when the Hypercities’ google-earth-based plug-in became no longer accessible. In another word, those projects could not be updated by scholars since the platform is no longer maintainable and updatable. To the contrary, the projects on the Neatline are readable and navigable with the aesthetic user interface thanks to the constantly updating platform. Neatline also gives extra hypertext ability to the project which strengthens the readability by allowing scholars to establish links among specific time, geographical locations, and text contents in a same web page.

Although Neatline is utterly a more sustainable platform than Hypercities, the projects based on Hypercities made a variety of unique arguments. Those projects, such as the twitter mapping, and the green street projects, emphasize on the importance of geographical location where the human activities take place. Instead, Neatline projects more focus on explaining and interpreting human activities through a geospatial lens. The fact that those two approaches are equally important to the spatial humanities, reminds us that the accessibility and maintainability are only the basic requirements, and an inspiring argument is what really solidifies a DH project.

Lab Session: Cultural Analytics & Visualizations

  1. What kinds of patterns are being examined and how are they being measured in the projects found at the Stanford Literary Lab?  Examine the content from 1 or 2 of those sites at the Stanford Literary Lab — then answer the two questions: a. what kind of patterns are being examined/analyzed? b. how are those patterns being measured?

The Stanford Literary Lab analyzes networks from historical literature. They use computer models to trace the interactions between genres and patterns of growth.

Suspense: Language, Narrative, Affect: This project correlates the experience of suspense as it is felt by the reader and the features that may lead to producing suspense. They track these links through comparative analysis of “suspenseful” texts from 1750 to the present day.

Representations of Race and Ethnicity in American Fiction, 1789-1964: This project reconstructs racial discourse in American literature. They track the terms and imagery and compare this discourse with specific representations by using various analysis and visualization tools.

  1. Review the visualizations listed below.  What makes these visualizations successful?  Examine the content from 1 or 2 of the sites listed below.  How would you determine their success?  Are they successful?  How are you determining success?  What features (eg. use of color, graphic technique, etc.) make these successful visualizations?

To determine the success of a project it is important to measure the success of the visual component of color scheme and graphics. Additionally, I assess the content and description to further understand the context of the project. Lastly, I evaluate the effectiveness of the correlation between the visual and context.

http://www.visualisingdata.com/index.php/2015/01/make-grey-best-friend/

Make Grey Your Best Friend is effective and successful. I enjoyed, in particular, the Energy Flowchart. The representation projected a clear goal. The goal is to display how different energy sources will be used differently over time. The use of gray highlights the impact of coal. The Bloomberg Billionaires project is also intriguing because it exposes the billionaires in which the public does not know what they look like. Overall, the use of gray is effective throughout all the projects.

http://www.visualisingdata.com/2015/01/new-visual-package-chicago-planning-agency/

This visualization is appealing. From the color schemes to the images, it caught my eye. However, after a closer look, the various maps and charts are difficult to completely understand and are ambiguous in terms of labeling and purpose. The project assumes the audience is very familiar with Chicago. Overall, there is a lack of context which makes the visualization unsuccessful in conveying its purpose.

  1. Go to Dirt (Digital Research Tools) and choose one (1) tool listed under “Analyze Data” and one tool listed under “Visualize Data.” How might these tools be useful in analyzing large amounts of data? The tools will only be useful if they align well with the kinds of “big data” being examined.

Recogito 2 makes organizing texts and images easy and intuitive. It can pair annotation to the user’s data. It allows for collaboration. Overall, it organizes and cleans large amounts of data.

Gephi is a graphing and mapping software tool. Gephi works with text and is useful for text and network analysis. This tool uncovers patterns and networks within large samples of text.

 

-Alex Cadet

Digital Humanities Project Review: David Rumsey Map Collection

Alexander Kliot Straus

February 13th, 2017

CNMS-201W-01 Introduction to Digital Humanities

 

Review: David Rumsey Map Collection

URL: http://www.davidrumsey.com/

                                                           

            The David Rumsey Map Collection is an informative, interesting, and impressive digital archive that represents an exemplar of current, innovative, and developing research in archival development and digital humanities practices. David Rumsey began building his private collection in 1980, and in 1995 began making his collection public through this online website. The collection focuses on rare 16th through 21st century maps of North and South America, and contains maps of the World, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Oceania. The collection distinguishes “materials created in America and that illustrate the evolution of the country’s history, culture, and population.” The digital collection also contains varying types, forms, and styles of map, from globes to charts to children’s maps. There are currently over 67,000 items online and growing. What is most notable and respectable about this project is its integrity as an archive, it’s extensive scholarly research, and its utility, both as a digital artifact and developing, digital humanities project.

The Rumsey collection maintains Kate Theimer’s archival integrity as expressed in Archives in Context and as Context. The appraisal of this work was conducted by David Rumsey and Cartography Associates, of which he is the president. The digital archive maintains provenance with detailed descriptions and citation, as well as with the knowledge that each item can be traced to a physical piece through David Rumsey’s collection in San Francisco. The archive establishes collective control over the various types of artifacts through organized metadata and tags structured within Luna Imaging’s software for online image collections. Original order is also represented through innovative QuickTime VR, static panorama views that document Rumsey’s library space. Rumsey’s archive respectfully presents and preserves its artifacts’ unique source, history, and identity.

As a piece of digital scholarship, the Rumsey Collection seems to stand under, if not be an exemplar of, Todd Presner’s evaluation and standards. In an initial review of fundamentals, the website is well managed, documented, and designed, with information about requirements for compatibility between different hardware and software made available. The website itself is copywrite by Cartography Associates (2000), but primary and authorial credit is given to David Rumsey himself. The archive represents intellectual rigor through extensive scholarly research that represents both traditional and innovative practices. The collection combines, research, teaching, and services as an extensive unification of informative images, literature, annotation, and interactivity. Users can explore and learn with the ease of accessibility, share through open-source implementation, and participate in digital mapping through applications like Georeferencer, a Three Dimensional GIS Browser, and even Second Life. Peer review is enabled through a site feedback forum and contact information provided. The impact of this work is evident in its function as a preservation tool and scholarly resource, all structured within a simple and accessible interface. Although there may be approximate equivalences of these designs and practices elsewhere when it comes to archival integrity and digital scholarship standards, however this project is unique in its specific concentration on Rumsey’s collection and therefore is not replicable. Like many digital scholarship projects, this website exists in dynamic modification and continual editions. The development cycles, sustainability, and ethics of the site are transparent, providing information about their process, goals, and methods. There is a blog that updates users on current events concerning the collection, and even a Flash Collection Tour that guides the user through the site. Experimentation and risks are being taken with the structural and organizational software, which is always under scrutiny for clarity and accessibility, as well as with developing applications with innovative functionality, such as MapRank search, Georeferencer,

On first impression, the website was simple, organized, designed aesthetically, and dynamically interactive and immersive. Visiting the home page (URL: http://www.davidrumsey.com ), the user is introduced with a feed forum displaying information on the collection, associated literature, as well as software application and web tools for various functions to search, analyze, and interact with the maps in customizable ways. At the top of the site page is a navigation bar that allows the user to move between independent sub-categories of the online collection and web interface structure. The visual interface design was easily accessible and efficiently organized, which allowed for a smooth transition into utilizing its features and functions.

The David Rumsey Map Collection is a prime example of traditional practices merging with progressive, digital scholarship, respecting legacies and standards in both fields. The site hooked me and kept me baited with an environment and forum containing a growing collection of interesting information within a dynamic, web based structure. If any additional comments can be made on the projects progress, it is to continue encouraging innovative ideas and new technologies for sharing and user interaction in a developing Web 1.5.

 

 

Resources:

Presner, Todd: “How to Evaluate Digital Scholarship.” Journal of Digital Humanities (URL: http://journalofdigitalhumanities.org/1-4/how-to-evaluate-digital-scholarship-by-todd-presner/)

Brennan, Sheila A. and T. Mills Kelly. “Why Collecting History Online is Web 1.5.” (URL: http://chnm.gmu.edu/essays-on-history-newmedia/essays/?essayid=47 )

Theimer, Kate. “Archives in Context and as Context.” Journal of Digital Humanities 1, no. 2 (Spring 2012).

Writing Assignment 2: 3D Modeling

A Digital Humanities project that integrates 3D modeling into a pastime many Americans enjoy can be seen every Sunday. The NFL integration of the yellow first down line on Sept. 27, 1998 changed the way American Football has been viewed. This project was created with the goal of enhancing the enjoyment of watching Americas favorite sport. This system for transposing the yellow line onto the football field was developed by Sportsvision and ESPN. This project may not be found online, but it can be considered a DHi project, as it displayed how new technological tools can be used to display information in a different way. This project is interesting because many of us students at Hamilton that enjoy watching football on Sundays were too young to remember seeing a game without that yellow line marking a first down. Through the usage of video editing techniques Sportsvision and ESPN used new computational techniques to create a keystone addition to the game as we view it today. 3D modeling is part of this project because one of the main problems that were faced during the creation of this seemingly simple line was transposing it on the field in an authentic way. To preserve the authenticity of the line being on the field the league had to make it appear that the players were running over the line. The creators of the first down line then had to create a 3D model of the NFL field for every viewing angle of the field. They then had to collect the color that should be drawn over at each point on the field at different times of day to make sure that the ground is the only thing being drawn over, and not a similarly colored jersey of a player. As time has progressed, there has been more information and insightful markers added to the viewing interface for the fans. Although this form of digital humanities is not found online this project does apply to the field of study because of the idea behind the entire project. Sportsvision created a tool which shifted the way an entire nation views a form of entertainment and it provides more information to the viewer of the program in a completely innovative manner. The way that this program has cemented itself into the “norm” of the viewing experience can be seen in the backlash against FOX sports for removing the first down line in hopes of saving a few bucks. So, in a way this project has implanted itself into society in a way that databases have become part of our lives. Both provide a new way to view information and both provide a new-found ease of use provided by an advancement in technological tools.

 

References:

http://www.si.com/nfl/2013/07/18/nfl-birth-yellow-line

http://www.sportvision.com/football/1st-ten%C2%AE-graphics

 

Jacob Circelli